The crucible and the extra scene

Parris is a grim, stern man suffering from paranoia. Elizabeth automatically suspects Proctor of wrongdoing. So perhaps the play is better off without the second scene in Act II.

Up until this point, the audience has only heard about Elizabeth through Abigail and Proctor. Abigail would have been viewed as if she was becoming mentally instable and that all the lies and events were catching up to her mind by making her go crazy.

As a result, Proctor feels that Elizabeth continually scrutinizes his actions, which frustrates and angers him. Putnam urges Parris to head off his enemies and promptly announce that he has discovered witchcraft.

People would have viewed Abigail differently after this scene if it was placed back in the play. If Miller had let this scene in the Act when John had confessed it would have not made such an impact on Abigail as it did because if she had know he would have confessed she would have come up with a lie to protect herself from it.

John ends up telling Abigail that he was going confess the affair and prove to the court that she was faking the whole thing and that she needed to tell them that Elizabeth was innocent and she knew about the needle in the poppet and that she had been lying all along.

All along Abigail has been very effective in manipulating the community, the court and the other girls to fall in line with her plans. Prior to Scene 3, Abigail views Elizabeth as an inconvenience because she is preventing Abigail from being with Proctor.

She appears to believe that the wounds she has caused herself were. Proctor becomes angry because he told Mary Warren not to go to Salem.

Essay Example: The Crucible and the Extra Scene

When Proctor refuses to admit any feelings for Abigail or to even speak of their affair, Abigail grows angry and blames Elizabeth for his indifference. He asks Abigail if her name and reputation are truly unimpeachable. Tension and mutual frustration define their relationship.

The Crucible and the Extra Scene Essay

No, this is your wife pleading, your sniveling, envious wife! She wants to forgive Proctor and begin reestablishing their relationship, but she cannot forget what he has done.

The sense of accusing the innocent in the United States at this time parallels what happened in Salem, Massachusetts, when a number of girls accused innocent members of their community of being witches and were believed.

The readers would then not be able to view Abigail as a deceitful girl in the later Acts. For example, John Proctor is a married man and is bound to Elizabeth through their marriage promise or contract.

Why did Arthur Miller, the author of

She tells Proctor that she forgives him, but a lingering distrust plagues her. Because Betty lies unconscious, Abigail seizes the opportunity to speak with Proctor alone and reaffirm their relationship. Abigail tells John of the mental suffering she has gone through for the good of the town, and even shows John the physical proof of her sufferings: She tells Proctor that their servant, Mary Warren, has been in Salem all day.

Proctor hesitates and then reveals that he cannot prove what Abigail said because they were alone when they talked. He informs her that he fully intends to admit to their affair in court if it comes to it, and the scene ends with Abigail saying, "I will save you tomorrowThe Crucible and the Extra Scene Essay Words | 5 Pages changed the outlook that the read had on The Crucible and its characters, like Abigail’s character.

The Crucible and the Extra Scene In the original version of The Crucible, published ina second scene for Act II was written but Arthur Miller decided to take it from the future editions that came after that time - The Crucible and the Extra Scene introduction.

Act II, Scene 1 provides the audience with the first glimpse of Elizabeth and John Proctor together.

The Crucible

Up until this point, the audience has only heard about Elizabeth through Abigail and Proctor. Abigail has described Elizabeth as a cold "sniveling" woman who cannot possibly satisfy Proctor or make him happy. The Crucible and the Extra Scene (2 Pages | Words) In the original version of The Crucible, published ina second scene for Act II was written but Arthur Miller decided to take it from the future editions that came after that time.

A summary of Act I: Opening scene to the entrance of John Proctor in Arthur Miller's The Crucible. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Crucible and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests. The Crucible By Arthur Miller ACT I: Scene 1 SETTING: A bedroom in Reverend Samuel Parris‘ house, Salem, Massachusetts, in the Spring of the year, As the curtain rises we see Parris on his knees, beside a bed.

His daughter Betty, aged 10, is asleep in it. Abigail Williams, 17, ENTERS. ABIGAIL: Uncle? Susanna Wallcott‘s here from Dr. .

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The crucible and the extra scene
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